For Pet's Sake News for 05-14-2018

A positron emission tomography scan is an imaging test that allows your doctor to check for diseases in your body. The scan uses a special dye that has radioactive tracers. When highlighted under a PET scanner, the tracers help your doctor to see how well your organs and tissues are working. The PET scan can measure blood flow, oxygen use, glucose metabolism, and much more. Your doctor may order a PET scan to inspect the blood flow, oxygen intake, and metabolism of your organs and tissues. 

The PET scan involves radioactive tracers, but the exposure to harmful radiation is minimal. If you’re pregnant, think you may be pregnant, or you’re breast-feeding, you shouldn’t get a PET scan. There are times that, in order to get a more thorough image, a PET scan is combined with a CT scan. If additional radioactive tracer is needed for the CT scan, it can be harmful to people who have kidney disease or who have elevated creatinine level from other medications they are already taking. You should tell your doctor if you’ve experienced an allergic reaction during a PET scan before. 

Your doctor will provide you with complete instructions for how to prepare for your PET scan. Your body needs time to absorb the tracers, so you’ll wait about an hour before the scan begins. 

Keywords: [“scan”,”PET”,”doctor”]
Source: https://www.healthline.com/health/pet-scan

PetHarbor.com: Animal Shelter adopt a pet; dogs, cats, puppies, kittens! Humane Society, SPCA. Lost & Found.

Now you can browse adoptable, lost, and found pets in your area from the comfort of your smartphone or tablet! PetHarbor Mobile uses your geographic location to locate animals near you. You will receive the same results and have the same search functionality that you would using the web version of PetHarbor but optimized for mobile devices! By providing mechanisms for them to be adopted if they are available or found if they are lost. By empowering them to adopt a new animal companion, find a lost pet, or re-unite an owner with a lost pet that they have found. 

By connecting the public with the shelter and the animals contained therein. Dedication: This website is dedicated to those people who work in animal shelters. Our society has given to them a difficult and often heartbreaking task. It is a daily struggle that is largely unseen by the general public, and no pats on the back are given – rarely do they ever hear a simple ‘Thank you’. Day in and day out they meet their challenge with compassion, dignity, and humanity. 

You will find dogs and cats, puppies and kittens, sheep and horses, parakeets and hamsters. They come from your local animal shelter, SPCA, Humane Society, county or city Animal Control, and many private animal-welfare organizations. 

Keywords: [“animal”,”lost”,”shelter”]
Source: http://petharbor.com/search.asp?searchtype=ALL&rows=25&imght=120&imgres…

What to Feed Your Pet Rabbit

A nice mix of hay, vegetables, pellets, as well as fresh water will make your rabbit healthy and happy. Fresh hay should make up the bulk of your rabbit’s diet and needs to be readily available at all times. Adult rabbits can eat timothy, grass, and oat hays, while younger rabbits should be fed alfalfa. Hay is important for rabbits because it provides the essential fiber needed for good digestive health and it helps wear down a rabbit’s teeth for good dental health. Placing hay at one end of a litter box will also encourage the use of the litter box, as rabbits tend to eat hay and poop at the same time. 

Always wash your vegetables thoroughly before feeding them to your rabbit. Feed new vegetables in small quantities until you can judge if your rabbit reacts well to them. Do not feed rabbits the leaves from houseplants as many are poisonous to rabbits. For a full list of poisonous plants, visit the Sacramento House Rabbit Society’s page on the subject. Fresh water must always be available to your rabbit. 

If your rabbit does not seem to be drinking enough water you can leave the vegetables fairly wet when you present them. Do not feed your rabbit items high in carbohydrates like breads, crackers, pasta, pretzels, cookies, chips, or cereal. 

Keywords: [“rabbit”,”hay”,”vegetables”]
Source: http://myhouserabbit.com/rabbit-care/what-to-feed-your-pet-rabbit

How pets improve your health

Companion pets do more than make us smile; they’re actually good for our health. From reduced incidence of depression, lower blood pressure and overall stress reduction, a four-legged friend might be the best health plan money can’t buy. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the average companion animal can deliver extraordinary physical health results. In some cases, having a pet can improve your health more than medication alone – or at all. It’s no wonder then that more than half of households overall have a pet in the family. 

Maybe that’s why dogs and cats are associated with improved mental health, too. They simply love us, as is, and ask for nothing more in return. Reduced stress and incidence of depression; elderly people are less depressed if they own a pet. Recent widows who own pets use less medication and have fewer symptoms of any type of illness than those that don’t own a pet. Dog owners report being as emotionally connected to their pet as to their closest family members. 

Just a half hour in the company of a dog improves feelings of happiness and well-being. Perhaps it’s the military personnel and veterans who adopt through our program that sum it up best: pets give us a purpose in life, another reason to live. 

Keywords: [“pet”,”more”,”health”]
Source: https://petsforpatriots.org/how-pets-improve-your-health